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Can We Create A Clean Water Economy?

A new report from the Risky Business Project, founded by economic powerhouses Henry Paulson, Michael Bloomberg, and Tom Steyer takes a clear-eyed look at the at the economic risks of climate change and, more importantly, the economic opportunities of shifting to a clean energy economy. They conclude that there are both short- and long-term economic opportunities for investors that also reduce the risk of negative climate change impacts.

Their research-driven bottom line: a clean energy economy is both desirable and possible.

In some ways, we are facing the same risks and opportunities when it comes to providing clean and plentiful water supplies. We can continue to look solely at the costs of best practices for managing water, in agriculture or in urban water infrastructure. Or we can look at those costs as risk management investments that also reduce the drag on our economy resulting from wasted water, polluted drinking water (e.g. Toledo, Flint), and unsightly lakes and streams that reduce property values and tourism revenue.

In urbanized areas, USEPA estimates that we lose an estimated $2.6 billion annually in treated water that leaks out of damaged water mains. In both urban and rural areas, avoidable water contaminants like nutrients, lead, and toxins produced by blue-green algae are either adding costs to treatment, or damaging human and animal health.

Proactive clean water investments can and do fund local:

  • Family-sustaining jobs for engineers
  • Agronomists
  • Chemists
  • Public health professionals
  • Entrepreneurs of all stripes

Innovations that prevent problems arguably provide more value than jobs created to clean up damage caused by short-sighted thinking and poor planning.

One of the hallmarks of American leadership in the world is our can-do attitude.

We can maintain a strong economic position in the world and provide the cleanest, most sustainable water supplies. In fact, I would argue that these two goals are mutually dependent.

So, as we leave 2016 behind and think ahead to a new year and an approaching new decade, I ask you to reflect. Can we create a clean water economy? I say YES.

Are you up for the challenge?

#wecandothis

Sincerely,

Rebecca Power, Network Director

Ten Ways to Reduce Nitrogen Loads from Drained Cropland in the Midwest

Across the Mississippi River Basin, 45% reductions in nitrogen and phosphorus loads are necessary to meet national goals established to reduce the size of the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone. There are a number of practices now being promoted as a part of state nutrient strategies, all of which have different N-reduction effectiveness, spatial suitability, additional benefits and impacts, and cost. No one practice will be suitable for every acre, but every acre needs at least one new practice. A newly funded North Central Region Water Network Seed Grant project, led by the University of Illinois, is underway to develop a comprehensive package of information about these drainage water quality-improvement practices. This effort is leading off with the release of a booklet entitled “Ten Ways to Reduce Nitrogen Loads from Drained Cropland in the Midwest,” and will include presentations for educators, online modules for additional audiences, and a Ten Ways summary factsheet. Click the link above to download an electronic copy of the booklet.

The Ten Ways strategies include in-field cropping and management strategies (i.e., practices that reduce nitrate in the root zone), in-field strategies that modify the drainage system (i.e., practices that reduce delivery of nitrate to the field’s edge), and edge-of-field strategies (i.e., practices that remove nitrate at the edge of the field or downstream).

Please click here to complete a Google Form requesting access to the PowerPoint presentation modules that accompany the Ten Ways booklet. We’ll also provide a survey for your program to help us track understanding of the the Ten Ways and to evaluate the impact of this project.

Please credit the Ten Ways information, images, and associated presentation materials as:

Christianson, L.E., J. Frankenberger, C. Hay, M.J. Helmers, and G. Sands, 2016. Ten Ways to Reduce Nitrogen Loads from Drained Cropland in the Midwest. Pub. C1400, University of Illinois Extension.

 

Water Rocks! Education Summit, an Overwhelming Success!

Water RocksIn November, Water Rocks! hosted the Multi-State Youth Water Education Summit for non-traditional educators. This two-day Summit, hosted at Reiman Gardens in Ames, Iowa, brought together more than twenty educators from Iowa, Nebraska, Missouri, and South Dakota. Winner of a 2016 Iowa Governor’s Environmental Excellence Award in Environmental Education and based at Iowa State University, Water Rocks! is Iowa’s unique statewide youth water education program.

Participants at the early November Summit represented a wide range of professions, from county extension and state DNR offices, to 4-H and county conservation programs and botanical gardens. Thanks to generous funding from the North Central Region Water Network, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture, and the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (US EPA, Section 319 of the Clean Water Act), educators were able to take advantage of the opportunity to come to Iowa State University for water quality education and Water Rocks! training, and received not only reimbursement for their travel expenses, but also took home $800 worth of educational materials to use in their home programs!

Educators attending the Summit heard from Iowa State University faculty on the newest research related to water quality, soil health, nutrient transport from agricultural land, erosion and climate change. These expert presentations were followed up with interactive demonstrations from ISUEO’s Water Rocks! team, allowing Summit participants to channel their inner 5th graders, and engage with the educational presentations just as students would. Water Rocks! youth education modules covered a wide range of environmental topics, including biodiversity, watersheds, wetland ecosystems, and soil health. Attendees participated in regional roundtables to share their tools of the trade with the larger group, and also discussed the challenges they face in their home states in reaching target audiences.

The Water Rocks! Multi-State Youth Water Education Summit for non-traditional educators was an overwhelming success. It opened up dialogue among professionals in neighboring Midwestern states who face similar environmental issues and outreach challenges, and who hope to utilize Water Rocks! educational materials and music videos to address some of those challenges, and bring in a fresh, artistic perspective to their existing programming.

Spiny Water Fleas, a Cautionary Tale

By: Rebecca Power
 
My home watershed is Lake Wingra, Yahara Watershed, Dane County, Wisconsin. Sometime right around 2009, the spiny water flea was found in Lake Mendota, a part of the chain of rivers and lakes in the Yahara Watershed. While I am sad about the fact that there is now one more complicating factor in our efforts to maintain our local rivers and lakes for everyone to use and enjoy, I love the spiny water flea invasion story because it elegantly illustrates the importance of systems approach in water resource management and why we should err on the side of conservation.
So what’s the story, you ask?
The spiny water flea is native to the Ponto-Caspian region of Eastern Europe and Western Asia. It hitchhiked to the United States in the ballast water of a transatlantic shipping vessel, invading the Laurentian Great Lakes. It then hopscotched from the Great Lakes to inland lakes in the Midwest and Northeast U.S., including Wisconsin’s Lake Mendota.
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For decades, conservationists have been working to reduce the amount of phosphorus entering Lake Mendota and the associated algae blooms. Phosphorus sources are both urban and rural, with the majority of phosphorus coming from agricultural lands. Recent efforts by a diversity of partners have developed a robust plan for meeting water quality standards and an estimate for how much it will cost.
While human efforts to clean up the Yahara Watershed get most of the attention, we have a tiny partner in our efforts – the algae-munching Daphnia.  Daphnia eat enough algae to add 2 feet of water clarity (measured by the depth of secchi disk visibility) in Lake Mendota.
However, to hungry spiny water fleas, Daphnia are “like a nice, slow-moving piece of steak,” according to researcher Jake Walsh. Spiny water fleas have decimated Daphnia populations and led to subsequent increases in days where the water in Lake Mendota is green and murky.  Walsh and others estimate that a 71% reduction in phosphorus would be required to return the lake to pre-invasion conditions, costing between $80 and $163 million. This is on top of – and substantially more than – the estimated $44 million to meet to water quality standards.
And this is just one lake, in one Midwestern U.S. state.
For me, this story is a reminder of how important a systems approach is to maintaining our soil and water resources.  If I want to reduce algae blooms in my home watershed and across the North Central Region, I need to consider ballast water management as well as nutrient management planning. Projects like the STRIPS project led by Iowa State University, or projects that deepen our understanding of the microbiome and its impacts on soil and nutrient cycling remind us to think more broadly about how to be effective stewards of water resources.

Improve Your Soil Health Management Systems: Free Webinar

Iowa state university

 Soil Health Webinar: Aug. 24 from 9 a.m. – 10 a.m. CT presented by ISU and NRCS

Free webinar is open to anyone interested in improving their soil health management system

AMES, Iowa –  Field agronomists, farmers and others interested in soil health are encourage to join the soil health webinar on iowastateuAug. 24 from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. The webinar will be presented by Iowa State University Extension and Outreach in collaboration with the United States Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service (USDA-NRCS), and qualifies for one soil and water continuing education credit for Certified Crop Advisers.

“The objective of this webinar is to provide information that will help advance understanding of soil health concept and management practices that will improve soil health,” said Mahdi Al-Kaisi, professor of agronomy and extension soil management specialist at Iowa State University. “We also hope it provides an opportunity for professional training for those whom are seeking credits in soil and water management.”

This webinar will be an hour long presentation that covers three topics:

  • Presentation on soil health basic concept and soil functions, and soil physical and biological indicators by Al-Kaisi.
  • Application of management practices for improving soil biology as an essential component of soil health by Rick Bednarek, state soil scientist with USDA-NRCS.
  • Planning and resource management to enhance and protect soil heath, by Doug Peterson, Iowa and Missouri Regional Soil Health Specialist with the National Soil Health Division of the NRCS.

At the end of the three presentations, 10-15 minutes will be set aside to answer questions. Use the following link to access the webinar: https://connect.extension.iastate.edu/soilhealth/. The webinar will be conducted using Adobe Connect, so Adobe software is required to access the presentation.

“This webinar is applicable to anyone interested in soil health issues,” said Al-Kaisi. “The goal is to continue the discussion about soil health, and provide information about resources for farmers and agronomists that are available at ISU Extension and Outreach and the NRCS.”

If you are unable to view the recording on Aug. 24., a link to the webinar will be posted on the Iowa State University soil management web page (www.agronext.iastate.edu/smse/) within one week of the presentation date.

If you would like more information or have questions, please contact Mahdi Al-Kaisi at 515-294-8304 or malkaisi@iastate.edu.

Related Links:

Iowa State University Soil Management www.agronext.iastate.edu/smse/

Soil Health Conference http://register.extension.iastate.edu/soilhealth/mediaresources/media

Related Publications:

Iowa Soil Health Field Guide https://store.extension.iastate.edu/Product/Iowa-Soil-Health-Field-Guide

Iowa Soil Health Management Manual https://store.extension.iastate.edu/Product/Iowa-Soil-Health-Management-Manual

Iowa Soil Health Assessment Card https://store.extension.iastate.edu/Product/Iowa-Soil-Health-Assessment-Card

Contact:

Mahdi Al-Kaisi, Professor and Extension Soil Management Specialist

Iowa State University
515-294-8304
malkaisi@iastate.edu

Jerry Hatfield Awarded Hugh Hammond Bennett Award

This content came from the Soil and Water Conservation Society 2016 Conference Brochure

The Hugh Hammond Bennett Award recognizes extraordinary national and international accomplishments in the conservation of soil, water, and related natural resources.

Jerry Hatfield is a plant physiologist and the laboratory director at the USDA Agricultural Research Service National Lab for Agriculture and the Environment. Hatfield’s career has been devoted to soil and water conservation issues, and he travels and speaks tirelessly to raise awareness of the links between climate, agricultural management, production, and soil and water quality. While he did not create a new institution, he has managed a large research laboratory for a quarter of a century and has provided signi cant leadership to the Agricultural Research Service, academic societies, organizations focused on conservation, as well as to multi-institutional and multinational research efforts.

He has been responsible for providing the technical manage- ment for multiagency, multilocation, and multidisciplinary programs such as the Management Systems Evaluation Areas (MSEA) and Agricultural Systems for Environmental Quality (AWEQ) across the Midwest. Hatfield has also led efforts in livestock and cropping systems research, as well as the impacts of climate change on agriculture. His character and demeanor are outstanding. He is honest, persistent, and has great integrity. Like Hugh Hammond Bennett, he has tirelessly spent his career raising awareness in conservation and supporting and defending soil and water conservation issues. To this end, Jerry Hatfield is well deserving of this year’s Hugh Hammond Bennett Award. View more here. 

The Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC) has named Chad Watts as new Executive Director

Watts joined CTIC in 2012 as Project Director, leading a range of highly successful conservation programs including the Indian Creek Watershed Project, the Great Lakes Cover Crop Initiative and the influential National Cover Crop Survey, which has been cited in Congressional testimony.

“Chad’s deep commitment to conservation agriculture and his experience with agricultural conservation systems, local capacity building, and bringing a wide range of interests together to develop programs that help farmers and the environment make him an outstanding choice for CTIC’s executive director,” says Lara Moody, senior director of stewardship and sustainability programs at The Fertilizer Institute and chair of CTIC’s board of directors. “Chad’s organizational skills and leadership will help CTIC implement its new strategic plan.”

Watts, an Indiana native, began his career in conservation with the Indiana Department of Natural Resources soon after graduating from Purdue University in 1994. He then moved to The Nature Conservancy, where he launched the 1.2 million acre Tippecanoe River Watershed Project, which he managed for 12 years before joining CTIC. Watts lives with his family near Winamac, Indiana, and is very active in his local community.

CTIC, based in West Lafayette, Indiana, is national public-private partnership that champions, promotes and provides information on farming systems that conserve and enhance soil, water, air and wildlife resources. Since 2008, CTIC has hosted Conservation in Action Tours around the country, and this year’s event will be held in Treasure Valley, Idaho August 23-24. Find out more here.

Extension Programs Host Land Use and Management Practices to Enhance Water Quality Workshop; Curriculum Available for Use

Fargo, North Dakota –In the Northern Great Plains, livestock production and watershed management often go hand in hand. If not managed properly, this combination can lead to water contaminated with harmful bacteria.  This is the issue Miranda Meehan, her colleagues at North Dakota State University Extension, South Dakota State University Extension, and the University of Nebraska Extension set out to address by hosting two Land Use and Management Practices to Enhance Water Quality Workshops. The workshops provided training and curriculum to Extension professionals, educators and Technical Service Providers to help them address water quality concerns related to land use and nutrient management.

Participants can utilize the curriculum and skills learned at the workshop in programs within their areas/counties, miranda4increasing producers and land managers’ awareness of issues impacting water quality and knowledge of management strategies to improve water quality. Workshop curriculum including PowerPoints, presentations, handouts, and lesson plans are available for use here.

E.coli bacteria is the leading cause of impairment of many water bodies in the North Great Plains. This leading source of impairment has been linked to livestock production, specifically riparian grazing,” said Miranda Meehan, North Dakota State University Extension, “To date there has been no training provided to Extension educators in the project area on watershed management.”

The educational programs will increase public awareness of management and stewardship practices that will enhance habitat and water quality within watersheds in the participating states.

“Being able to learn the topic, then see, or apply the theory behind it in the field was great. Also, meeting other professionals you can introduce to local producers and improve their operation and stewardship practices is beneficial,” said attendee Nicole Wardner, NDSU Extension Service, “We don’t always have the answers, but if you can direct them or link them with someone who does it keeps momentum going for improving the land.”

The workshops are part of a seed-funded project grant provided by the North Central Region Water Network which is a 12-state collaboration designed to enhance connectivity across regional and state water projects, develop and carry out integrated outreach and education efforts, and coordinate projects with measurable short and long-term environmental and social impacts. More information on this seed-funded project and curriculum that was presented at the workshops can be found here: Professional Development for Extension Professionals and Educators on Land Use and Management Practice to Enhance Water Quality.

For more information, contact:

Miranda Meehan, Extension Livestock Environmental Stewardship Specialist, North Dakota State University

701-231-7683

miranda.meehan@ndsu.edu

For media inquires, contact:

Amber Schmechel, UW-Extension, Environmental Resources Center

608-262-1377

aschmechel@wisc.edu

miranda 2

Midwest Cover Crops Council appoints program manager

July 5, 2016

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – The Midwest Cover Crops Council has responded to increasing interest in cover crops across the region by hiring its first program manager, a Purdue Extension educator.Anna Morrow began her new role with the MCCC as a staff member in Purdue University’s Department of Agronomy on July 1. She now works out of Extension’s Shelby County office and will be on the university’s West Lafayette campus as needed.

 
“We are excited to have an experienced county Extension educator join our team as our first program manager,” said Eileen Kladivko, professor of agronomy and a founding member of the MCCC. “Anna brings experience in working with producers on a variety of challenges in Midwestern row crop and animal agriculture, and we look forward to working with her to move cover crop adoption and the MCCC into the future.”

 
Kladivko said the council has continued to grow since its beginnings in 2006, as has the interest and use of cover crops across the Midwest.

 
“We needed a full-time program manager to help improve our current outreach tools and develop new ones, provide timely information on cover crops to our website, be a point of contact for the council, and generally improve our capacity to be the go-to source of information about cover crops in the Midwest,” she said.

 
Morrow grew up on a small Indiana farm of livestock and crops in Shelby County near Saint Paul, and she still helps on it. She earned a B.S. in biochemistry and an M.S. in agronomy at Purdue, through which she researched soil and pasture management on a Costa Rican dairy farm. She had been Franklin County’s agriculture and natural resources educator for Purdue Extension since 2012.

 
The MCCC is a regional group committed to facilitating widespread adoption of cover crops across the Midwest for purposes of soil health, water quality and crop productivity. It creates Extension products such as a pocket field guide and an online Selector Tool and presents educational meetings about cover crops across the region consisting of 12 states and Ontario, Canada.

 
More information about the MCCC is available on its website at www.mccc.msu.edu.

Writer: Keith Robinson, 765-494-2722, robins89@purdue.edu

Sources: Eileen Kladivko, 765-494-6372, kladivko@purdue.edu
Anna Morrow, 317-392-6460, annamorrow@purdue.edu

Monitor Water Quality During Grazing

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Original Article

FARGO, N.D. — While some parts of North Dakota have received ample rainfall during the early growing season, other areas have not and are experiencing reduced hay crops and lack of pasture regrowth. In addition, these areas are having water quality issues in places where rainfall is needed to refresh stock ponds and watering holes.

“There are reports of areas in the southwest and parts of central North Dakota that are having water quality issues in stock ponds and watering holes where cattle have no other options for water,” says North Dakota State University Extension Service livestock environmental stewardship specialist Miranda Meehan.

Poor water quality can impact livestock health negatively, according to Gerald Stokka, NDSU Extension veterinarian and livestock stewardship specialist.

“At a minimum, it can result in decreased water consumption, reducing feed intake and gains,” he adds. “However, elevated levels of some salts and bacteria can result in severe illness and even death.”

NDSU veterinary toxicologist Michelle Mostrom says water sources should be tested for total dissolved solids (TDS), sulfates and nitrates. TDS measure salts. These levels should be less than 5,000 parts per million (ppm) for most classes of grazing livestock. Elevated levels of TDS may not be harmful to livestock health.

“However, due to our geology in North Dakota, water with high TDS often has high sulfate levels,” Mostrom says.

Sulfate recommendations are less than 500 ppm for calves and less than 1,000 ppm for adult cattle. High levels of sulfate can reduce copper availability in the diet. Elevated levels of sulfates may cause loose stool, whereas very high levels of sulfate can induce central nervous system problems and polioencephelomalacia, a brain disorder found in cattle.

Nitrate is not toxic to animals, but at elevated levels, it causes nitrate poisoning. Water sources that receive runoff from fields and confined feeding locations that contain elevated levels of nitrogen are at risk of contamination.

Water with elevated nutrient levels also are at a higher risk for blue-green algae blooms in periods of hot, dry weather. Some species of blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) contain toxins that can be deadly when livestock and wildlife consume them.

“Monitoring water quality throughout the grazing season is important because it changes in response to climate and environmental conditions,” Meehan says. “What is especially important is to keep a close eye on water quality during drought when using a shallow water source and sources with a history of water quality issues.”

Many commercial laboratories and the NDSU Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory provide testing for livestock water quality and specialized testing. The cost of a basic water quality test is approximately $25. Contact an NDSU Extension office for a list of commercial laboratories in the state.

If concerned about livestock diseases caused by contaminated drinking water, contact your local veterinarian, the NDSU Extension veterinarian or the NDSU Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at 701-231-8307 or http://www.vdl.ndsu.edu/.

More information on livestock water quality is available in the following Extension publications:

Livestock Water Requirements (AS1763) – http://tinyurl.com/LivestockWaterRequirements
Livestock Water Quality (AS1764) – http://tinyurl.com/LivestockWater
Nitrate Poisoning of Livestock (V839) – http://tinyurl.com/LivestockNitratePoisoning
Cyanobacteria Poisoning (Blue-green Algae) (V1136) – http://tinyurl.com/NDSUBlue-greenAlgae
— NDSU Agriculture Communication